Charged With A Crime? It Doesn’t Mean You’re Guilty.

Introducing Contraband in Jail / Prison – C.R.S. 18-8-203, 204

| Apr 13, 2013 | Jail |

Did you know you could be charged with Introducing Contraband in the Second Degree, a class 6 felony, if you give a woman an uncancelled postage stamp while she is in the custody of a Denver, Arapahoe, or Jefferson County, C.R.S. 18-8-204(2)(d)? It is true, uncancelled postage stamps are among a long list of items that can get you into trouble if you pass them to an inmate in any county jail or detention facility in Colorado. Other prohibited items include forged identification cards, matches, pornography, cigarettes, telephones, or pagers. Loved ones, thinking they are doing a small favor – can find themselves joining a friend on the inside by sneaking in prohibited items. It is easy to see how someone may get caught up in this situation.

It does not take much research on the internet to learn that many people charged and convicted of Introducing Contraband into a detention facility are correctional officers, guards, and other “public servants.” The motive in these cases usually involves monetary reward. Not long ago, a guard at the Englewood Correctional Facility was convicted of Introducing Contraband and Accepting a Bribe as a Public Official, C.R.S. 18-8-302. He was smuggling tobacco and rolling papers to inmates in exchange for money which was mailed to his home. In a more recent case, just last month, a prison guard in Florence, Colorado was convicted of accepting bribes and introducing marijuana into a federal prison under similar circumstances. She was convicted in Federal Court.

The more serious offense of First Degree Introduction of Contraband, involves smuggling dangerous instruments such as guns, knives, poison, or any item capable of causing fear of death or bodily injury. For obvious reasons, this crime is treated more seriously and results in a longer prison sentence. I remember a Boulder, Colorado man who was charged with First Degree Introduction of Contraband when he smuggled a bobby pin to an inmate in court. According to the statute, a detention facility is any place where an inmate is likely to be located. This may be in a Douglas County jail, in a Denver juvenile detention facility, or in the back of an Arapahoe County patrol car.

Whatever your situation, the lawyers at the O’Malley Law Office, P.C., are committed to defending your side of the story. We know that being charged with Introducing Contraband in Adams, Douglas, or Weld County, does not mean you are guilty. So if you are being questioned by the police, be smart, exercise your right to remain silent, and call our experienced criminal defense attorneys at 303-731-0719. Together we can protect your future.