Increase in Denver Sex Crimes, Why? - Q and A

Sex Offenses in Denver on the Rise

Why Do We Highlight Sex Offenses So Much on our Website?

Colorado Internet sex offenses like enticement of a child, C.R.S. 18-8-305, Internet luring, C.R.S. 18-3-306 and Internet sexual exploitation of a child, C.R.S. 18-3-405.4 are emerging crimes, following the advancement of the Internet. As the Internet grows, Colorado police are moving deeper into chat rooms, message boards and other meeting places where sex is discussed. This is fertile ground to find people with a heightened libido who will talk with police as they pretend to be children interested in sex. It is relatively simple for police to reach thousands of people across the country who engage in this conduct. Once police identify their pretend "child" as living in Colorado, they will gain jurisdiction over people from any state.

With Colorado "Emerging Sex Offense Crimes," Why Do We Say "Emerging"?

Pornography use continues to erode the inhibitions people have to resist sexual contact with children and other adults. Juvenile-initiated (those committed by minors) sexual assault cases are growing as children act out what they've seen on the Internet with other children. Adults are being captivated and changed by sexual acts they've seen in pornography. They adopt a new "normal" sexual behavior. What once seemed extreme is no longer extreme, but normal. Adults meet strangers for sex, and these risky contacts result in sex crimes.

Have Police Changed What Crimes They Charge and What They Don't?

Denver, Aurora, Arvada, Jefferson County and Douglas County police and sheriffs are simply charging more sex cases today. The reason is twofold: Law enforcement are busier than ever before and they don't want to take the risk of being wrong with a no-charge decision. They often want to file their report and let the court sort out who is telling the truth. They no longer dig to determine motives of children or ex-lovers for making sex crimes allegations. If law enforcement decide not to file a case, they run the risk of something happening to the victim down the road if they are wrong. It is simply much safer to file every allegation and let someone else shoulder the risk of dismissing a case and being wrong. Careers can be lost with a wrong decision.

Are People Making More Allegations of Sexual Misconduct Today?

Sexual assault and sexual abuse allegations are the rage today. They are easy to make with no proof required. If a child or teen wants to get his or her disciplinarian stepfather out of the house, the child only has to make an allegation to the police, a teacher or a counselor. Since police don't examine motive, the step-dad is immediately arrested, charged and required to stay out of the house and have no contact with their "victim." In divorce custody cases, we are seeing more cases where mothers, who spend the most time with children, get a kid to say the father touched him or her inappropriately. The father or stepfather is then arrested and charged. The mother gets the house, all the bank accounts and all the assets. It is easily a year before the father can contest being shut out, and in many cases he ends up in prison. Divorce attorneys even have a name for this: they call it the "nuclear option."

What Are Criminal Defense Lawyers Doing in Response to These Changing Times?

We are trying to educate the public on our website and in our blog of the dangers of being alone with children. Men and boys in professions like child care, sports and teaching need to leave those professions. It is simply not safe to be around children today when governmental scrutiny has vanished and most everyone is susceptible to sex offense charges. We have also changed our approach with juries to educate them on the need for physical proof in these cases. Exposing jurors to motives of children and disgruntled spouses has also been helpful in obtaining "not guilty" verdicts from juries at trial.

Final Comments on the Increased Denver Sex Crimes?

It is never ok to speak with the police not for you and not for your children. You don't know if the person you are talking to is after the truth or not. Many officers have told us and courts directly that lying to potential defendants is a regular part of their procedure during questioning. If you are is contacted by police concerning allegations of sexual misconduct or criminal sex offenses, be smart, exercise your right to remain silent and call us at 303-731-0719. Together, we can protect your future.

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